The March 2012 issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology published a study that demonstrated ZymaDerms™ is effective in reducing or eliminating molluscum lesions in over 85% of children in 30 days.

SUMMARY

Evidence for the effectiveness of ZymaDerm™ in the treatment of molluscum contagiosum was announced on March 12, 2012 by Naturopathix,Inc., with the publication of a randomized controlled clinical trial demonstrating that the combination of tea tree oil and organically bound iodine found in ZymaDerm™ is effective in reducing or eliminating molluscum lesions in over 85% of children in 30 days. The study was published in the March issue of the prestigious Journal of Drugs in Dermatology and conducted by the Center for Biomedical Research,Inc.

Boise, Idaho (PRWEB) March 24, 2012 — Naturopathix, Inc. has announced publication of scientific evidence that the ingredients in all natural ZymaDerm™ are effective and safe in the treatment of molluscum contagiosum in children.

“This is the second published study showing effectivenss of ZymaDerm™ against molluscum and we are thrilled” said Briant Burke,MD, MS the CEO of Naturopathix,Inc. The study appeared in the prestigious Journal of Drugs in Dermatology in the March issue. The results were from a randomized, placebo controlled blinded study which is the gold standard in science, and provides evidence of the highest quality. The first study was also a randomized placebo controlled trial and was published in 2004.

Both studies were conducted by the independent Center for Biomedical Research,Inc. and taken together, provide clear and convincing evidence of the effectiveness of Zymaderm’s™ ingredients in providing a painless natural alternative treatment for this common childhood condition.

The only full strength topical, non-drug, painless remedy for molluscum contagiosum with published evidence of effectiveness, Zymaderm™ is a patented blend of powerful all natural plant-based compounds. It is widely recognized for transforming the treatment of molluscum from costly and painful procedures to making the unsightly and contagious molluscum warts simply vanish quickly, painlessly and inexpensively.

“Since ZymaDerm’s introduction in 2003,” says Briant Burke,MD,MS Naturopathix’s CEO and developer of ZymaDerm™,“ hundreds of thousands of children and adults have easily gotten rid of visible molluscum simply by dabbing on a pleasant aromatic blend twice a day, usually for less than a month.”

“In addition to over-the-counter sales in leading drugstores,” continued Dr. Burke, “we are especially gratified that many leading dermatology clinics and pediatricians around the country are replacing invasive treatments with gentle, effective ZymaDerm™ for their patients with molluscum. To encourage even more physicians to use ZymaDerm™, Naturopathix, will continue to offer free samples to physicians and clinics upon request.”

Click Here To Download The Study

 

86% of Doctors Surveyed Prefer Painless Topical Application of ZymaDerm™ To Other Treatment Options For Molluscum Contagiosum

In an independent study conducted by the School of Business at Boise State University, of 346 physicians who used samples of ZymaDerm™, a natural non-toxic topical treatment for their patients with molluscum contagiosum, 92% of responding physicians rated it as effective, it was announced today by Naturopathix, Inc. the manufacturer of ZymaDerm™.

Of the physicians sampled, 86% stated that they were either likely or extremely likely to use ZymaDerm as their preferred treatment method for molluscum contagiosum, compared to prescription drugs, over-the-counter treatment options, or physical destruction of lesions.

“This is a very important study,” says Naturopathix’s CEO, Briant Burke, MD, MS, “because it clearly demonstrates that when doctors have treated patients with ZymaDerm™, they prefer its safe, gentle and effective topical application, to other more invasive, aggressive or costly treatments.

“Traditional treatments in the doctor’s office, such as curettage or application of a blistering agent for the molluscum rash, can be extremely painful,” continued Dr. Burke. “This causes real distress to the child, and for the parent witnessing it.”

 

 The Molluscum Contagiosum Scientific Study

Molluscum contagiosum is a common childhood viral skin condition and is increasingly found as a sexually transmitted disease in adults. Current treatment options are invasive, requiring tissue destruction and attendant discomfort. Fifty-three children (mean age 6.3 + 5.1 yrs) with the diagnosis of molluscum contagiosum were treated with twice daily topical application of either essential oil of Melaleucaalternifolia (TTO), a combination of TTO and organically bound iodine (TTO-I), or iodine alone. At the end of 30 days, 48 children were available for follow up. A greater than 90% reduction in the number of lesions was observed in 16/19 children treated with TTO-I, while 1/16 and 3/18 children met the same criteria for improvement in the iodine and TTO groups (p<0.01, ANOVA) respectively by intention-to-treat analysis. No child discontinued treatment due to adverse events. The combination of essential oil of M. alternifolia with organically bound iodine offers a safe therapeutic alternative in the treatment of childhood molluscum.Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12610000984099.

The study below was conducted by the Center for Biomedical Research,Inc. and has been published in the peer-reviewed prestigious medical journal, Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, 2012, vol 3: 349-354. This material is copyrighted and reproduced here by permission. This study is in scientific format.

To view the entire publication in PDF file, click on the link:

JDD PDF File

Combination of Essential Oil of Melaleuca alternifolia and Iodine in the Treatment of Molluscum Contagiosum in Children.

Eric Markum, MD, PhD1and John Baillie, MD1

1Center for Biomedical Research, Boise, Idaho 83706

Introduction

Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a common and benign contagious viral skin condition of childhood occurring worldwide. It was first described by Bateman in the beginning of the nineteenth century.1 MC currently accounts for approximately 1% of all diagnoses of skin disorders in the US2, 3 with an occurrence of up to 10% in the pediatric population under age 10.4 The incidence of sexual transmission in the adult population is also rapidly increasing.5, 6 In addition, between 5% and 20% of patients with HIV have symptomatic MC7.

The molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) is a doubled-stranded DNA poxvirus with no significant animal reservoir. 8-11 It is a cytoplasmically replicating virus and proliferates in the follicular epithelium.12 In immunocompetent patients the illness is self-limited and MCV infection generally does not recur.8 However, MCV exhibits an ability to avoid host defense mechanisms,13, 14 and it is not unusual for lesions to persist and spread. The lesion presentation may vary from small papules that may be mistaken for atopy but more often reveal the characteristic central umbilication permitting easy identification (Fig. 1).

The general recommendation for treatment is expectant management,3,12 with spontaneous resolution generally occurring in 12-30 months. However, lesions may spread to the face or cover extensive portions of the body, prompting the desire for treatment. Treatment options largely depend upon tissue destruction and include curettage, cryotherapy, laser, electrodessication, or application of caustics such as trichloroacetic acid, KOH, or cantharadin.15-17 Recently, topical immune modulators such as imiquimod have been used with some success.18 However, all current treatment options involve some degree of pain, discomfort, or irritation to the patient with accompanying distress to the parents of small children. In addition, treatments that rely on tissue destruction may increase the risk of infection and scarring.3,12,19 Thus, the need exists for a safe, painless, effective, and rapid treatment option.

Our previous studies with Australian lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) demonstrated clearance of lesions in less than 50% of children with MC.20 However, there are more recent reports of cytotoxic effects with use of this oil.21 In an attempt to improve both safety and efficacy, we evaluated other formulations.

The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil, TTO) has been used topically as an antiseptic for decades,22 while chemical and therapeutic characterization of the essential oil (steam distillate) from M.alternifolia has a body of literature dating back to 1925,23 demonstrating broad spectrum antibacterial24-29 and antifungal30,31 action. Iodine has also been used topically for decades worldwide as a safe and effective topical antiseptic. The known antiseptic actions of iodine and tea tree oil, in conjunction with their long history of topical safety, prompted us to evaluate the combination of TTO and iodine as a topical treatment for MC.

We tested topical application of a tea tree oil – iodine preparation (TTO-I), TTO alone, and topical iodine alone as control in the treatment of MC in 53 children in a randomized, placebo controlled, blinded protocol with intention-to-treat analysis. Forty eight children completed the study and were available for follow up. The results after 30 days of treatment showed a 90% or greater reduction in the number of visible molluscum lesions in 16/19 (84.2%) children treated with the TTO-I preparation versus 1/16 (6.2%) and 3/18 (16.7%) children treated with iodine or TTO alone, respectively. These results demonstrate the potential efficacy and safety of the combination of TTO and organically bound iodine as a therapeutic modality in treatment of MCV.

Study Protocol

Fifty-three children (mean age 6.3 + 5.1 yrs) with MC were enrolled (Table 1). Children were otherwise healthy without major disease, at or above the 50th percentile for height and weight, and met all age-appropriate developmental milestones. Mean length of time with the diagnosis of molluscum was 5.6 + 5.3 months. Detailed written informed consent was obtained from the parents, and the study protocol was in conformity with the Helsinki Accords regarding human subjects.

The TTO-I preparation contained 95% (v/v) essential oil of Australian Melaleuca alternifolia (terpinene-4-ol content 40.1%, conforming to Standards Association of Australia, AS 2782-1985) and organically bound iodine in a proprietary formulation (U.S. patent #7,311,928 generously provided by Naturopathix, Inc., Boise, ID) to yield a total iodine concentration in the formulation of 35 micromolar. The preparation contained no preservatives, additives, or solvents. The identical tea tree oil was used in the TTO alone group. The iodine alone formulation contained the same organically bound iodine in a vehicle of virgin olive oil to yield a total iodine concentration in the formulation of 35 micormolar.

Children were randomized to treatment group. Nineteen children were randomized to TTO-I, 18 children to TTO alone, and 16 to iodine alone. Treatment consisted of application of one 4 ul drop to each molluscum lesion twice daily. Treatment was continued for 30 days or until all lesions had resolved if this required less than 30 days. Treatment was considered successful if lesions completely cleared or were reduced in number by greater than 90% by the end of day 30. Parents and physicians were blinded to treatment protocol. Participants were seen every 10 days to monitor progress and assess for adverse events. A mild synthetic lemon fragrance not containing citral was added to scent the iodine olive oil preparation. This fragrance by itself had no therapeutic effect (data not shown).

Results

Forty-eight children were available for follow up at the end of 30 days. In the TTO-I treated group, 1 child was lost to follow-up, 2 had reductions in the number of lesions but did not meet the 90% criterion, 11 had total resolution of all palpable lesions, and 5 had reductions in the number of lesions greater than 90% at the end of 30 days for a total of 16/19 children meeting the study criteria for treatment success. In the TTO alone group, 5 children had some reduction in the number of lesions but did not meet the 90% criterion, and 4 children met the 90% reduction criterion. In the iodine treated group, 2 children withdrew as the parents perceived worsening of the molluscum and sought other treatment, 4 children had spontaneous reduction in the number of lesions but did not meet the 90% reduction criterion, and 1/16 met the 90% reduction criterion. There was variation in the number of molluscum lesions at the end of 30 days in the iodine and TTO groups, some children having an increase and some a decrease in lesion number.

The treatment was well tolerated and often resulted in a dramatic clearing of visible molluscum lesions (Figs. 2-3). The mean number of lesions at enrollment was 22 + 19 (mean + sem) and did not differ between treatment groups. Lesion number for the entire study population ranged from a minimum of 7 to a maximum of 69, with a median value of 29.

Adverse effects were limited to a small amount of redness around the base of some lesions. Of the 48 children available for follow up, 4 mothers (1 TTO-I, 2 iodine, 1 TTO) reported areas of redness that were concerning to them on a total of 21 molluscum lesions. No area of redness was larger than the 3 mm radius, and no lesion showed signs of infection. No patient discontinued treatment due to adverse reactions. It was not uncommon for parents to report lesions themselves becoming reddened during course of treatment, but no parent reported pain or discomfort in the child from this redness. Parents of 3 children in the TTO-I group and 4 in the TTO group reported a transient sensation of warmth with application, which cleared in approximately 90 sec or less. The difference in incidence of reports of redness around lesions between TTO-I, TTO alone, or iodine was not statistically significant, but both treatment groups had a greater incidence of redness of lesions themselves than the iodine alone group. There was no blistering or other sign of gross cytotoxic effect from application of either TTO-I or TTO alone for the duration of the study. There was no correlation between the number of lesions present on a child at the beginning of the study, and treatment effect.

Discussion

MCV is a cytoplasmically replicating, double stranded DNA virus possessing a complex genome encoding approximately 182 proteins,8 and exhibits genetic heterogeneity with four types, MCV-1 to MCV-4 and their variants.32,33 In small children, the majority of infections are caused by MCV-1; whereas in patients infected with HIV, MCV-2 causes the majority (60 %) of infections.34 The genetic makeup of the MCV in this present study is unknown. Furthermore, it is unclear if genetic heterogeneity contributed to the differential effects observed, with some strains being sensitive to TTO-I application while others were not.

Clinically MC is frequently seen on the face, neck, axillae, arms, and abdomen but may occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles.5,12,19 It occurs predominantly in pre-adolescent children, but also occurs in sexually active adults as an STD, participants in sports with skin-to-skin contact, and in those with impaired cellular immunity such as HIV positive individuals.19 Onset of lesions caused by MCV is usually gradual, beginning as a group of minute papules in one or two areas. Individual lesions are discrete, smooth, and may be inflamed but more typically appear as characteristic pearly, flesh-colored, dome-shaped papules with central umbilication12 (Fig 1). Variation in appearance is common, and the condition may be mistaken for eczema when the lesions are small.

Like its viral relative, variola virus, MCV is specific to humans with no significant animal reservoir,3 although rare isolated cases have been reported in a kangaroo and a horse.10 MCV is cytoplasmically replicating and proliferates within the follicular epithelium. Infected cells grow in size, while cellular organelles are dislocated and eventually obliterated by a large intracytoplasmic inclusion. Rupture and discharge of the virus-packed cells occurs, and debris and MCV accumulate in the central crater-like ostium12 (Fig. 1). Infection is spread by skin-to-skin contact and by autoinoculation. In immunocompetent patients the illness is self-limited, and MCV infection generally does not recur.9 However, MCV exhibits an ability to avoid host immune defenses by a variety of complex mechanisms,12 and it is not unusual for lesions to persist and spread, sometimes extensively (see Fig. 1B). Diagnosis is based on the appearance of the lesions and can be confirmed by skin biopsy.

Iodine has been used for decades as a topical antiseptic. It is used by activated white blood cells as part of the killing mechanism directed against bacteria and viruses,35,36 and has also been used clinically with limited success by topical application in the treatment of herpes simplex,37 another virus with a large and complex genome. The US Centers for Disease Control recommends iodine for topical antisepsis against MCV on surfaces,39 however since topically applied iodine does not penetrate the stratum corneum well it has little activity against MC when used alone on intact skin. Only very small quantities of iodine are absorbed through an intact skin37,38, thus posing little risk of systemic toxicity or effects on thyroid function when topically applied.

Tea Tree Oil (essential oil ofMelaleuca alternifolia; fam. Myrtaceae) is a small paper-barked tree indigenous to swampy regions along the north coast of New South Wales and Queensland, Australia. Leaves of the tree were first used medicinally by the Aborigines, and the tree became known by the common name of ‘tea tree’ when Captain Cook and botanist Joseph Banks investigating local flora (c. 1770), used the leaves of the tree to brew a spicy tea22. Steam distillation of the leaves yields an essential oil that came into use as a folk remedy as settlers colonized the indigenous portions of Australia, and in more modern times has found use in the cosmetic and perfume industries, as well as a food additive. Modern investigation of TTO properties began in 1925 when Penfold23 extracted the oil and demonstrated antiseptic and anti-bacterial properties. The whole oil exhibits fungicidal activity against skin dermatomycoses22,30,31 and bactericidal activity against a variety of pathogens including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.22,23,25 Known toxicity is low.40.41,47 Tea tree oil TTO has been associated with skin sensitization, but at an incidence of <0.01%.41

Hausen et al42studied the influence of light, oxygen, and heat on TTO’s ability to induce reaction inTTO-sensitive patients. Fifteen normal constituents or degradation products from TTO were patch tested in otherwise healthy volunteers. Fresh TTO was revealed to be a very weak sensitizing material whereas oxidized TTO was 3 times stronger. Oxidation and photodegradation of alpha-terpinene in the oil resulted in dramatic increases in the chief sensitizing agent, p-cymene. The authors conclude that the degradation products were the principal sensitizers, and proper handling and storage of the oil were able to minimize this effect.

MCV has not been successfully cultured, hampering in vitro studies. A few reports of antiviral activity of TTO have been reported.43-45 Tea tree oil added at non-cytotoxic concentrations (0.003%) to African Green Monkey Kidney (RC-37) cell cultures inhibited propagation of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-I) by over 98% in a viral plaque reduction assay,43 demonstrating strong inhibition of a complex enveloped virus in vitro. The authors conclude that free virus appeared to be very sensitive to the antiviral effects of TTO. The reduced infectivity of virus after incubation with TTO suggests that TTO may bind to virion envelope structures or may mask viral components necessary for adsorption or entry into host cells, but the exact mechanism is not known. It is unclear if these findings in culture relate in part or at all to the mechanism of action in this present clinical study. A clinical report of topical TTO against common hand warts caused by HPV, has also appeared.45

The speed of action of TTO-I and a lack of generalized inflammation associated with its use suggested that the mixture was not acting as a generalized immune stimulant (e.g., Aldara), but rather may act more directly to inhibit viral propagation in some manner as discussed above. Furthermore, the apparent lack of a generalized toxicity to the skin in this study suggests that TTO-I was not acting by means of non-specific tissue destruction. The skin permeation effects of TTO are fairly limited,48,49 however there are components with significant lipophillicity.46 The mechanism underlying the synergy between TTO and iodine demonstrated in this study is unclear. It may relate to enhanced penetration of iodine into superficial layers of skin by the TTO or some other as yet unidentified interaction.

The results of this study suggest that tea tree oil and organically bound iodine in combination are efficacious and safe in the topical treatment of molluscum contagiousm in children.

References

1) Bateman F. Molluscum contagiosum. In: Shelley WB, Crissey JT, eds. Classics in Dermatology. Springfield IL; Charles C Thomas, 1953;20.

2) http://www.emedicinehealth.com/molluscum_contagiosum/article_em.htm

3) Husar K, Skerlev M. Molluscum contagiosum from infancy to maturity. Clin Dermatol 2002;20:170-2.

4) Gottlieb SL, Muskows PL. Molluscum Contagiosum. Int. J. Derm 1994;33:453-461.

5) Baldwin HE. STD update: screening and therapeutic options. Int J Fertil Womens Med 2001;46:79-88.

6) Becker TM, Blout JH, Douglas J, Judson FM. Trends in molluscum contagiosum in the US. 1966-93. Sex Transm Dis 1996;13:88-92.

7) Schwartz JJ, Muskowski PL. Molluscum contagiosum in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. J Am Acad Derm 1992;27:583-585.

8) Senkevich TG, Koonin EV, Bugert JJ, Darai G, Moss B. The genome of molluscum contagiosum virus: analysis and comparison with other poxviruses. Virology 1997;1233: 9-42.

9) Dohil P, Lin J, Lee A, Lucky A. Paller L, Eichenfield LF. The epidemiology of molluscum contagiosum in children . J Amer Acad Derm 2006;54: 47 – 54.

10) Danzall, BG, Witson GR Molluscu contagiosum in a red kangaroo. Aust J Derm 1974;15:115-7.

11) Van Resburg IB, Collett MG, Ronen N, Gerdes T. Molluscunm contatiosum in a horse. J S AfrVet Assoc 1991;62: 72-74.

12) Habif TP Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy. 2nd Ed., St. Louis: CV Mosby Co; 1990 p. 248-9.

13) Moss B, Shisler JL, Xiang Y, Senkevich TG Immune-defense molecules of molluscum contagiosum virus, a human poxvirus. Trends Microbiol 2000;10:473-7.

14) Diven DG. Recent advances in moll cont virus res. Arch Virol Suppl 1997;13:35-47.

15) Silverberg NB, Sidbury R, Mancini AJ. Childhood molluscum contagiosum: experience with cantharidin therapy in 300 patients. J Am Acad Dermatol 2000;43:503-7.

16) Romiti R, Ribeiro AP, Romiti N. Evaluation of the effectiveness of 5% potassium hydroxide for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum. Pediatr Dermatol 2000;17:495-8.

17) Hanson D, Diven DG. Molluscum Contagiosum. Dermatol Online J 2003;9:2-13.

18) Berman P, Poochareon VN, Villa AM. Novel dermatologic uses of the immune response modifier imiquimod 5% cream. Skin Therapy Lett. 2002;7:1-6.

19) Smith KJ, Skelton H. Molluscum contagiosum: recent advances in pathogenic mechanisms, and new therapies. Am J Clin Dermatol 2002;3:35-45.

20) Burke BE, Baillie JE, Olson RD. Essential oil of Australian lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) in the treatment of molluscum contagiosum in children. Biomed Pharmaco 2004;58:245-247.

21) Hayes AJ, Markovic B. Toxicity of Australian essential oil of Backhousia citriodora (Lemon myrtle). Part 1. Antimicrobial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity. Food Chem Toxicol 2002;40:535-543.

22) Carson CF, Hammer KA, Riley TV. Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) oil: a review of antimicrobial and other medicinal properties. Clin Microbiol Rev 2006;1:50-62.

23) Penfold AR, Grant R. The germicidal values of some Australian essential oils and their pure consituents. J Proc Royal Soc NSW 1925;59:346-350.

24) Carson CF, Riley TV. Antimicrobial activity of the major components of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. J Appl Bacteriol 1995;78:264-269.

25) Carson CF, Riley TV. Susceptibility of propionibacterium acnes to the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. Lett Appl Micro 1994;19:24-25.

26) Carson CF, Riley TV. The antimicrobial activity of tea tree oil. Med J Austr

1994;160:236-239.

27) Carson CF, Cookson BD, Farrelly HD, Riley TV. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. J Antimicrob Chemother 1995;35:421-424.

28) Carson CF, Hammer KA, Riley TV. Broth micro-dilution method for determining the susceptibility of Eschericha. coli and Staphylococcus aureus to the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. Microbios 1995;82:181-185.

29) Elsom G. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to tea tree oil and mupirocin. J Antimicrob Chemother 1999;43:427-428.

30) Belaiche P. Treatment of skin and nail infections with the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia-Cheel. Phytother 1985;15:15-18.

31) Hammer KA, Carson CF, Riley TV. Susceptibility of transient and commensal skin flora to the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil). Am J Inf Control  1996;243:186-189.

32)  Nakamura J, Muraki Y, Yamada M, Hatano Y, Nii S. Analysis of molluscum contagiosum virus genomes isolated in Japan. J Med Virol 1995;46:339-48.

33) Porter CD, Archard LC. Characterization by restriction mapping of subtypes of moll cont virus. J Med Virol 1992;38:1-5.

34) Odom RB, James WD, Berger TG. Andrews’ Diseases of the Skin-Clinical Dermatology, 9th Edition. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Company.  2000;501-503.

35) Wutzler P, Sauerbrei A, Klocking R, Brogmann B, Reimer K. Virucidal activity and cytotoxicity of the liposomal formulation of providone-iodine. Antiviral Res  2002;54:89-97.

36) Murray PR. Medical Microbiology, 4th ed. Mosby. 2005; 381-3.

37) Reynolds JEF ed. (1989) Martindale, the extra pharmacopoeia, 29th ed. London, The Pharmaceutical Press. 1989; 1184-1186.

38)Dela Cruz F, Brown DH, Leiken JB.  Iodine absorption after topical administration. West J Med  1987;146: 43-45.

39)Centers for Disease Control recommendations available at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/molluscum/swimming/swimming_recommendations.htm.

40) Hammer KA, Carson CF, Riley TV, Neilsen JB. A review of the toxicity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil. Food Chem Toxicol  2006;44:616-25.

41) Fritz TM, Burg G, Krasovec M. Allergic contact dermatitis in cosmetics containing Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil). Ann Dermatol Venereol  2001;128:123-126.

42) Hausen BM, Reichling J, Harkenthal M. Degradation products of monoterpens are the sensitizing agents in tea tree oil. Am J. Contact Dermat  1999;10:68-77.

43) Schnitzler P, Schon K, Reichling J. Antiviral activity of Australian tea tree oil and eucalyptus oil against herpes simplex virus in cell culture.  Pharmazie  2001;56:343-7.

44) Astani A, Reichling J, Schnitzler P. Comparative study on the antiviral activity of selected monoterpenes derived from essential oils Phytother Res  2010;24:673-9.

45) Millar BC, Moore JE. Successful topical treatment of hand warts in a paediatric patient with tea tree oil. Complement Ther Clin Pract  2008;14:225-7.

46) Murray KE. The essential oils of 5 western Australian plants Royal Australian Chemical Institute and Proceedings 1950;17:398-410.

47) Hammer KA, Carson CF, Riley TV, Neilsen JB. A review of the toxicity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil. Food Chem Toxicol. 2006;44:616-25.

48) Cross SE, Russell M, Southwell I, Roberts MS. Human skin penetration of the major components of Australian tea tree oil applied in its pure form and as a 20% solution in vitro. Eur J Pharm Biopharm  2008;69;214-22.

49) Reichling J, Landvatter U, Wagner H, Kostka KH, Schaefer UF. In vitro studies on release and human skin permeation of Australian tea tree oil (TTO) from topical formulations. Eur J Pharm Biopharm.  2006;64:222-8.

 

 

Table 1: Effect of TTO, TTO-I, and I Alone on Visible Molluscum Lesion Number After 30 Days

 

Number Enrolled Children with > 90% Reduction Mean # Lesions at Study Entry (+ sem) Mean # Lesions at Study Conclusion (+ sem) Lost to F/U
Iodine 16 1 21 +29 24 +  19 2
TTO 18 3 19 +23 18 +   22 2
TTO-I 19 16*^ 24 +19  3  +   4*^# 1

 

* p<0.01 (One Way ANOVA) compared to iodine alone.

^ p<0.01 (One Way ANOVA)  compared to TTO alone.

# p<0.01 (One Way ANOVA) compared to day 1.

 


Fifty-three children (mean age 6.3 + 5.1 yrs) with molluscum contagiosum were enrolled. Treatment consisted of application of one 4 ul drop with a glass applicator rod to each molluscum lesion twice daily. Treatment was continued for 30 days or until all lesions had resolved if this required less than 30 days. Treatment was considered successful if lesions completely cleared or were reduced in number by greater than 90% by the end of day 30. The mean number of lesions at enrollment was 22 + 19 (mean + sem) and did not differ between treatment groups. At study conclusion after 30 days of treatment with TTO-I, 2 children had reductions in the number of lesions but did not meet the 90% criterion, 11 had total resolution of all palpable lesions, and 5 had reductions in the number of lesions greater than 90% for a total of 16 of 19 (84.2%) children treated with the TTO-I combination having a 90% or greater reduction in the number of visible molluscum lesions.

Figures

Figure 1: Typical umbilicated appearance of molluscum lesions (A) on the abdomen of a 7 y/o girl and, B) severe molluscum on leg of 4 y/o girl.

Figure 2:  Molluscum on the thigh of 5 y/o girl before (A) and the same girl (B) on day 30 after treatment with TTO-I.

Figure 3: Molluscum on the neck of 6 y/o girl at start (A) and the same girl (B) after 20 days of treatment with TTO-I.

Author for Correspondence:

Eric Markum, MD, PhD

Center for Biomedical Research, Inc.

Boise, ID 83706 USA

E-mail: drmarkum@cbrmed.org

 

Molluscum contagiosum, a common childhood condition, can be safely treated with a combination of tea tree oil and organically bound iodine.